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The First Wing Night Wednesday Of 2013 AND…

I survived.

My body didn’t go into wingless-itic shock.

And I didn’t involuntarily drink three – or more – pints of beer.

Cause ya know, that’s what you (I) do on wing night. Beer, wings, sports.

Instead, a nice evening combo of housework, Nike+ training and a delicious stir fry chock full of veggies. Boy do I love to cook. I wish I could bottle that feeling I get watching someone devour the meal I just made. Or how I feel about myself after planning, prepping and creating a delicious, healthy dish.  A cook’s high, I suppose.

Why is it that we KNOW how good doing something we love, or just doing something that is simply good for us, makes us feel yet we consciously choose to not do those things?

Default behavior. Excuses. Laziness.

So how do we get beyond this seemingly infinite emotional battle between self-sabotage, guilt, and that gung ho yet fleeting inspiration to make better choices for ourselves? Is the popular “21 days to healthier habits” school of thought accurate? What’s the key? How can we make this automatic, where we take decision making and thinking out of the process?

When I have time to think about something, I overthink everything. It’s why I was much better playing third base than I was playing second base. At such close proximity to the batter’s box, especially with right hand hitters, I depended on my reflexes and instincts because I didn’t have the extra seconds to think about what I was going to do with the ball once I got it at the hot corner. It was all routine. It was all automatic. Second base? Forget it. What angle should I take to the ball? Should I flip it underhand or throw overhand? Do I have time to tag the runner first? E-4. Dammit. (E-4 is how you score an error by the second baseman, just in case you were wondering what the heck that was)

How did I get automatic at third base? Reps. Lots and lots of reps. The more you do something the more it seems to do itself. The effort you gotta muster up becomes less and less. Muscle memory takes over. So, it’s time to attack healthy habits the same way I did softball.

Practice.